This day, at 98 years old, the death of the outstanding Chilean-Spanish painter and printmaker, Roser Bru, was confirmed, who was awarded the 2015 National Prize for Plastic Arts due to her renowned artistic career.

The information was confirmed by the foundation that bears her name, an organization that, through her Facebook account, detailed that the artist “lived away from social life and the artistic environment in the last two years due to her advanced age, but keeping alive her interest and disposition for brushes, shapes, and color, which she maintained until her last days ”.

On the wall of the social network, the foundation reviewed her career, highlighting, among other things, that “her vast work expresses its concern for social and human problems, mainly women, where the female body is a matter in a borderline situation. Her multiculturalism penetrates his work from her Catalan-Chilean condition to the intersection of influences in her artistic connection with other countries in the Latin American region ”.

“The Foundation and family regret with deep sadness the departure of one of the last great exponents of the 20th century and maintain that ‘the figure of Roser Bru will continue to live in the pages of the history of Ibero-American art, and we will contribute to the dissemination of her legacy, life, and work to the new generations, ‘” they commented.

Likewise, the Minister of Cultures, Consuelo Valdés, also lamented the death of the painter, decorated by King Juan Carlos I of Spain in 1995, saying that “to think of Roser Bru is to think of a freedom fighter through art. Today we bid farewell to one of our great creative women, but at the same time we treasure the example of mettle and talent that in 2015 made her worthy of the National Prize for Plastic Arts ”.

While from the Pontificia Universidad Católica, where Bru worked, they detailed that “she was not only a UC teacher at the Faculty of Arts but also a national award for Plastic Arts in 2015. From the UC community we highlight her legacy and send him a hug to their loved ones ”.

“May her work and legacy travel the seas. “One assumes all ages, because that’s life,” once said the artist who arrived in Chile in 1939 aboard the Winnipeg. Farewell to an artist with tireless work and a strong commitment to human rights ”, they added, meanwhile, from the UC Aesthetic Institute.

Amelia Warner– After graduating from NYU with a master's degree in history, She was also a columnist for many local newspapers. Amelia Warner mostly covers Entertainment topics, but at times loves to write about movie reviews as well.

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