Lygia Fagundes Telles Dies At 98 In SP

Paulistana was a member of the Brazilian Academy of Letters since the 80s and has already received the Camões and Jabuti awards.

The writer Lygia Fagundes Telles died at the age of 98 in São Paulo. An icon of Brazilian literature, she was a member of the Brazilian Academy of Letters since the 1980s and has already received the Camões and Jabuti awards.

According to Juarez Neto, from the Brazilian Academy of Letters, she died at the home of natural causes.

Lygia received several awards throughout her career, such as Camões (2005) and Jabuti (1966, 1974, and 2001). She has works translated into German, Spanish, French, English, Italian, Polish, Swedish, Czech, Portuguese and Portuguese, as well as adaptations of her works for film, theater, and TV.

Lygia spent her childhood in cities in the interior of São Paulo. The family lived in Sertãozinho, Descalvado, Areias, Apiaí, as dictated by the career of Dr. Durval de Azevedo Fagundes, as delegate and public prosecutor. Her father would die in 1945, and her mother, Maria do Rosário Silva Jardim de Moura, in 1953.

As a young girl, Lygia discovered what she wanted to do in life, write stories. And she started scribbling the first stories on the back pages of the school notebook, to tell them at family gatherings. At the age of 15, she launched a book of short stories, “Porão e Sobrado”, with the help of her father. This, and other writings, even the ones she released shortly afterward – Praia Viva ”, from 1945, and “O Cacto Vermelho”, from 1949, did not pass the sieve of the adult Lygia, who deleted the youthful outbursts of the body of work. “Fruits of immaturity,” she explained.

 

Amelia Warner– After graduating from NYU with a master's degree in history, She was also a columnist for many local newspapers. Amelia Warner mostly covers Entertainment topics, but at times loves to write about movie reviews as well.

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