The Cuban actress and dancer, naturalized in Mexico, excelled in the so-called Golden Age of Mexican cinema

The Cuban actress and dancer Amalia Aguilar, who excelled in the so-called Golden Age of Mexican cinema, and stood out in films alongside Germán Valdés “Tin Tan” and Adalberto Martínez “Resortes”, died at the age of 97.

On the night of this Monday, November 8, her family released the news through their official Facebook page, but without revealing the causes of her death.

“RIP Amalia Aguilar. Today we say goodbye to the mother, the grandmother, the actress but especially the friend. May your light caress the life of everyone who vibrates within your heart, thank you for being our guide and strength. Forever your children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren ”, the publication reads.

One of the greatest exponents of the Rumberas Cinema

Amalia Aguilar was born on July 3, 1924, in Matanzas, Cuba, but became a naturalized Mexican. She was a dancer, rumbera, vedette, singer, comedian, and actress who managed to stand out as one of the greatest exponents of the Rumberas Cinema in the Golden Age of Mexican cinema.

When she was a child, she began her career in Cuba alongside her sister. In 1944 she was discovered by the Cuban dancer Julio Richard, who launched her to fame in Mexico.

In 1945 she made her film debut through the film “Pervertida”. From there she was followed by roles in “Calabacitas tender” (1949), “Ritmos del Caribe” (1950), “Al son del mambo” (1950) and “Mis tres viudas alegres” (1953).

They called him “La bomba atómica” and “El torbellino del Caribe.”

She also participated in a Hollywood musical film titled A Night at the Follies (1947) and was baptized as “The Atomic Bomb” and “The Caribbean whirlwind”, due to hER way of dancing.

Through social networks, experts in the Seventh Art and music, such as the film director Julián Hernández and Pável Granados , general director of the National Music Library, have expressed their feelings about the departure of Amalia Aguilar.

The place where hER remains are veiled, as well as what his last resting place will be, is unknown until now.

We share one of the works of Amalia Aguilar in the cinema.

 

Amelia Warner– After graduating from NYU with a master's degree in history, She was also a columnist for many local newspapers. Amelia Warner mostly covers Entertainment topics, but at times loves to write about movie reviews as well.

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